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Other Lessons

Page history last edited by Newman Lanier 9 years, 8 months ago

Other Lessons:

 

 

Economics - students will study a particular item or group of items on the in-world auction house learning how supply and demand are affected by the actions of the player-citizens in the game.  Students may also take part in that economy. 

Helga Brown has contributed an Economics lesson plan (WoW E-conomics.doc) that requires students to use gathering and creating professions to run a small business. Students group to form a virtual store front, participate in market analysis, create a business plan, apply for a start up loan, and run a small business through the in-game Auction House.

 

Math/Writing: Raid/Instance Groups

Pick a dungeon. What raid or instance group configuration would be the best to handle this instance? Analyze the group for each particular boss (how many healers, how many tanks, how many ranged dps, how many melee, etc.). Keep in mind the attacks associated with that boss. Make sure you address all of the roles in a group (healing, tanking, dps, crowd control, etc.). Collect data to support your theory.

 

Math/Writing: Raid Buffs

What raid buffs would be most beneficial to your class? How would they affect your role (dps, healer, tank, etc.)? Collect data to support your theory.

 

Ecology/Herbalism/Azerothian Wildlife

 

The designers of virtual worlds often take the time to make their worlds realistic.  Part of this involves creating natural spaces that look and feel like real-world spaces.  Though set in a fantasy world, World of Warcraft is no exception.  Azeroth has its own flora (plant life) and fauna (animal life).  In the real world certain plants and animals are only found in certain climate regions.  For example, many cacti grow in arid, or dry, regions.  The venus fly trap only grows in the sandy soils around southeastern North Carolina.

  • Create a field guide for plants and/or animals in Azeroth.
  • Describe the climate and ecology of where the plant or animal is living.  Does this look like a dry/wet region?
  • Take screenshots of your plant/animal and add them to your description.  Place this information in a Wiki. 

 

 

Project Planning and Technical Communication

Create flowcharts for spec'ing a toon or for fighting.  As an example, Boomkin flowchart .  Students could create, evaluate and revise flowcharts based on in game activities, and then present / share them with guild / class members.

 

 

Comments (4)

Helga Brown said

at 2:57 pm on May 19, 2009

Here is a link to a movie made by a second grader similar to the wildlife lesson. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0UL-LZDEgI

Greta Niu said

at 3:28 pm on Jul 28, 2009

Has anyone had students exploring how Asian cultures and peoples are incorporated on WoW? (I'm thinking of Helga Brown's lesson plan on investigating Native American art in Wow.) I would be very interested in seeing such a lesson plan or completed assignment. Thank you in advance.

Lucas Gillispie said

at 7:04 am on Jul 29, 2009

Greta,
That would be a great idea! Would you be interested in creating a lesson for that?

Helga Brown said

at 8:19 am on Jul 29, 2009

One obvious influence in WoW from Asian cultures is the Lunar Festival. It coincides with Chinese New Year (Lunar New Year) and focuses on honoring one's elder. Some correlations include: lanterns, fireworks, style of the festival attire, red paper envelopes given by elders, coins, red lantern decorations, fire cracker scroll decorations, feasting, fighting off a large mythical beast once a year, festival dumplings, and recipes to create red holiday clothing. My lesson plan could be easily adapted to students listing some Chinese New Year themes and characteristics and then "scavenger hunting" them in the game during the time of the festival.

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